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Old 06-03-2009, 03:22 PM   #1
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Storing TT on soil during the season

We want to park our T-1950 beside our garage during the season in between trips. It's a part of the lawn where grass doesn't grow and is basically dirt. My DH thought putting boards under the tires would prevent the tires from sinking. Is that a good idea or is there a better way to do it??
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Old 06-03-2009, 03:52 PM   #2
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Boards

We carry 1 foot lengths of 2 x 6's for this purpose. We cut one end square and the other with a slope.

We cut a piece of plywood the same size and screw and glue it to one surface to the 2x6. The plywood keeps the 2x6 from cracking along a grain line. Use water proof or resistant glue.


We do have a single axle trailer you might want to make them longer for a double axle rig.

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Old 06-03-2009, 04:48 PM   #3
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For a tandem trailer on dirt or grass, 2x8's cut to about 18" lengths will do the trick.

You will find it helpful if you cut the wood at a 45 degree angle. The tires will ride up on the boards easier.

Norm's tip about screwing and gluing a piece of plywood to the 2by stock is a good one. Be sure to use CDX or marine grade plywood and place it on the side of the boards that does not contact the ground.

For the boards to last more than one season, use pressure treated lumber.

Some folks use 4 or 5 foot lengths of board stock for this to cover both tires at once. Bad idea. If the board flips up when you drive on to it, it can do some serious damage to the undercarriage of the trailer.

If this is your regular storage spot, make up enough boards to level the trailer side to side. If necessary to raise one side of the trailer, cut some boards shorter than the 18" ones and stack them up. You want the trailer level so you can safely fire up the refrigerator a few days before you go out so that you can stock it.

FWIW, experienced trailer folks carry a selection of these boards with them on every trip. It is a lot easier to level the trailer side to side by driving it up on boards than trying to jack up one side or the other after you've dropped it.
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Old 06-03-2009, 05:00 PM   #4
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Would those leveling blocks like LYNX work also??
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:38 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy G.
Would those leveling blocks like LYNX work also??
They will work, but you have to put down several of them under each tire. If the underside of the Lynx isn't smooth and flat like a board, they will just dig into the ground like a cookie cutter.

The idea is to spread the weight over a larger surface area to prevent the tires from sinking into the ground. Depending on the type of soil and potential moisture, it may be advisable to create an even larger base. Possibly by putting down two boards side by side facing east/west, and then putting a single board on top of it facing north/south. Essentially doubles the amount of area pressing on the ground.
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:36 PM   #6
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We use 2X6 boards long enough to support both tires on each side of the trailer. If you want a more permanent solution, a row of pavers from the nearest Lowes/Home Depot garden shop works well and it's a lot cheaper than a concrete driveway extension.
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Old 06-04-2009, 09:15 AM   #7
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We use Lynx levelers while camping, very easy to store and use, not only under tires for side to side leveling, but also under the stabilizer jacks. We carry 3 bags of 10 blocks each, four toppers that hook into the blocks to give you a level surface for the jacks, and two chocks that also lock into the blocks.

I would not use them for home storage though, they are plastic and subject to UV damage. I would use boards or the pavers for long term use.
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Old 06-04-2009, 09:23 AM   #8
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We also store our coach in the side yard. I have some concrete pavers placed so that all four tires are up off the dirt when it's parked.

I used 12x12 concrete pads from LOWES.
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Old 06-04-2009, 10:24 AM   #9
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Just remember that over time, concrete leaches some chemicals out of the tires which causes the tires to deteriorate faster than normal. If you're going to park your TT on concrete pavers, put something between the tires and the pavers.

I park my TT on a concrete pad year-round, and place boards under the tires on one side to level it, and old rubber floor mats on the other side.
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:57 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Collins
Just remember that over time, concrete leaches some chemicals out of the tires which causes the tires to deteriorate faster than normal. If you're going to park your TT on concrete pavers, put something between the tires and the pavers.

I park my TT on a concrete pad year-round, and place boards under the tires on one side to level it, and old rubber floor mats on the other side.
Thanks Steve

H'mm concrete leaching out tire chemicals. So that is the problem. Always heard about long term storage on concrete but never the actual reason why. Also heard about water and wet on concrete but again never a clue to why.

I did learn a trick on how to insulate between tire and concrete. Use a shingle. Like the kind on your roof. Easy on, easy off.

Now I have a good lead to go do more reading on, Chemical reaction, tires and concrete. Learn something new here every day on SOC.

Thanks

John
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:00 AM   #11
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Quote:
Just remember that over time, concrete leaches some chemicals out of the tires which causes the tires to deteriorate faster than normal. If you're going to park your TT on concrete pavers, put something between the tires and the pavers.

I park my TT on a concrete pad year-round, and place boards under the tires on one side to level it, and old rubber floor mats on the other side.
I did not know this! I do have a couple of old rubber floor mats I could use to go between the tires and the concrete.

Does this sort of interaction affect ALL tires? I may have to "insulate" tires on my truck, car and motorcycle to make them last longer!
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:52 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkasten39828
Does this sort of interaction affect ALL tires? I may have to "insulate" tires on my truck, car and motorcycle to make them last longer!
It is worse on something like a TT which just sits for months on end in the off season or even between trips with a single part of the tire in constant contact with the concrete. As far I a know, this is a slow, long term process. Your car or truck probably gets moved almost daily so the part of the tires that sits on the concrete is constantly changing.

Something like a motorcycle which may also get stored for a long period should probably have something between the tires and the concrete.

It certainly would not hurt to have something in your garage or carport, too but I don't know how much it would preserve tires that are in daily use.
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