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Old 05-08-2014, 03:20 PM   #1
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Omg! Leak! Leak!

Ok I am trying to remain calm however.....As I am working on my trailer to:
1. Go to the Midwest Sunline Owners Rally
2. LIVE IN IT!

I sold my house. Closing is May 30th and I have 20 days after that to vacate.

"The plan" was to RVing awhile but now I have this bad leak that will probably require who knows what? Part of the sub-floor removed and replaced? The front door rehung?

The funny thing is (not really) I just had the roof done at the dealer. However I do not think its the roof but the door. I always thought it was not hung correctly. It's been rainy here to the last week. A couple of nights ago it really stormed and we got a lot of rain

But I have no idea what to do! I do not know anyone that knows anything about this and the dealer would charge an arm & a leg!!

Just spend $587 at the dealer getting the roof resealed and a new temp control in the AC. I also need to get the wheel bearings repacked IF I was going to RV around the country as I have never had done it.

The dealer quoted me $349 but was going to check around
And I just ordered awesome material to make curtains and pillows and stuff
And I just put in a new floor in last year

But back to the leak and the rotten sub floor and what to do about it?

The leak seems to be confined meaning it is a long rectangle about 4 in running

I pulled out the molding around the door and that wasn't wet. I looked under the RV but there some kind of black insulation and I imagine I would have to cut that to see how deep the leak is. For sure it's bad in the one spot around the door

I am SO bummed. I have sooo much to do, trying not to stress but this is bad



SEE PICTURES BELOW

HELP!!!!!!!!!!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_3924.jpg (81.6 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_3925.jpg (90.4 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_3928.jpg (104.0 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_3927.jpg (115.0 KB, 13 views)
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Old 05-08-2014, 03:33 PM   #2
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I just felt the floor up to the oven cabinet wall and that feels fairly damp which means it could be under the cabinet floor where the drawer is. I did put bleach on the black mold.

Maybe people like me shouldn't own RVs
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Old 05-08-2014, 04:07 PM   #3
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there will be plenty of knowledge at the M&G. I think we might be able to pull of a bearing packing while there. To bad about the leak.
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Old 05-08-2014, 05:45 PM   #4
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Ok this is BADDDDDDDD

SEE PICTURES

Its just NOT the subfloor its the main structure that is damaged

I replaced the flooring last summer and saw the sub floor and did not see any sign of a leak.

We are not talking repair, we are talking rebuilt. At this point I don't know where the leak is coming from. Could be the frt corner? Or Window?

So since I do not know where its leaking I not sure what to do with it? Take it back to storage (after cleaning every square inch)?

However, it's looks like this is probably it.

I do not have the expertize or the money to remove the door, window and rebuilt structure, replace subfloor and on & on and on

At this point I have no idea.

You know what they say. You should always have a Plan B. I didn't


IMG_3931.jpg

IMG_3932.jpg

IMG_3935.jpg
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Old 05-08-2014, 05:59 PM   #5
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So sorry to see that. Water is a trailer worst enemy.
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Old 05-08-2014, 07:06 PM   #6
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Thank you but what can be done??


Quote:
Originally Posted by jim44646 View Post
So sorry to see that. Water is a trailer worst enemy.
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Old 05-08-2014, 08:29 PM   #7
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FIRST: Don't lose hope. ... I know, easier said than done.

I will throw out some guesses here but I am confident someone that knows more will come along and give better advice.

It looks like the worst is under the corner of the door and may extend a bit under the wall frame. It is possible that just a few feet of the wood frame that sits on top of the metal frame can be replaced. That would require removing part of the bottom siding under the door to cut out a short section of wood frame and replacing just that section. Hopefully someone here has some pictures to show it. It probably doesn't require a RV tech ($$$$) but a good handyman/woman.
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Old 05-08-2014, 08:38 PM   #8
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Thank you! I guess I am in shock. I just spend about 3 hours cleaning the inside and found it. Never expected it. And then to packing and moving at the same time. Really? I cried so hard. I thought I took really good care of her. She was always stored inside, maintained and cleaned inside, out and the roof every time I got her out of storage.

However, that's why when I discovered I posted here first thing. So Super knowledgeable and helpful people here.

Thank you again Gene, all we need is a little hope


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
FIRST: Don't lose hope. ... I know, easier said than done.

I will throw out some guesses here but I am confident someone that knows more will come along and give better advice.

It looks like the worst is under the corner of the door and may extend a bit under the wall frame. It is possible that just a few feet of the wood frame that sits on top of the metal frame can be replaced. That would require removing part of the bottom siding under the door to cut out a short section of wood frame and replacing just that section. Hopefully someone here has some pictures to show it. It probably doesn't require a RV tech ($$$$) but a good handyman/woman.
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Old 05-08-2014, 09:33 PM   #9
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Hi Joan,

So sorry to see and hear about your floor issue. This is however very fixable which is the good part of this type of camper, it can be fixed with ordinary wood working tools and knowledge.

Now to the "who" to fix it. Do you have a friend or family member who has wood working tools and knows how to use them? There is some level of RV experience however it is more knowing what materials to use on the rebuild and how the camper put together.

If you have a wood working friend, we can help point them in the right direction. The looks of the decay of the floor supports point to this has been going on for some time and finally surfaced.

The rebuild will need to get all the rot out and find the source of the water intrusion. This can be tricky as the bad spot "might" be low spot and the collection site for where the water pools at. You mentioned roof, this might not be a roof problem.

There is hope, just have to find the right helper person. The cost of the raw materials is not that bad, the labor is the issue if it is hired at standard RV shop rates.

We can access this at the M & G. For temporary a piece of plywood etc over the spot so you do not step/fall in it would be a good idea.

John
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Old 05-08-2014, 09:54 PM   #10
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Thank you John

I now think the leak is in the corner and the low spot is by the door. I don't know how you fix that, pull the corner piece off? Would wall have to be replaced?

I do have some handyman friends/family but I do not know if they are THIS handy but I can check. The ones I spoke about this to all want me to get her fixed and get on the road as they know it what I really want. and I know I can get some help

You will look at the floor at the Rally? I wasn't sure if I should come but I was really looking forward to it. So I should come then?




Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnB View Post
Hi Joan,

So sorry to see and hear about your floor issue. This is however very fixable which is the good part of this type of camper, it can be fixed with ordinary wood working tools and knowledge.

Now to the "who" to fix it. Do you have a friend or family member who has wood working tools and knows how to use them? There is some level of RV experience however it is more knowing what materials to use on the rebuild and how the camper put together.

If you have a wood working friend, we can help point them in the right direction. The looks of the decay of the floor supports point to this has been going on for some time and finally surfaced.

The rebuild will need to get all the rot out and find the source of the water intrusion. This can be tricky as the bad spot "might" be low spot and the collection site for where the water pools at. You mentioned roof, this might not be a roof problem.

There is hope, just have to find the right helper person. The cost of the raw materials is not that bad, the labor is the issue if it is hired at standard RV shop rates.

We can access this at the M & G. For temporary a piece of plywood etc over the spot so you do not step/fall in it would be a good idea.

John
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Old 05-08-2014, 10:21 PM   #11
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Joan, sent you a PM. Take a look

John
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Old 05-08-2014, 10:25 PM   #12
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as John said come on down and have fun. It was built once it can be built again. We can look and assess then. John has rebuilding experience. I myself have some. The problem is the miles in between.
If everything works out I may by coming a day early.
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Old 05-09-2014, 04:07 PM   #13
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Emme & I will be at the Rally and looking forward to it! Thanks for all your help in advance!
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Old 05-10-2014, 02:17 PM   #14
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Joan I sent you a PM look see.
Jim
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Old 05-10-2014, 02:25 PM   #15
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Hi Jim,

I read it but the system would not allow me to reply to your message?
I have no problem replying to anyone else

However, Thank you so very much!!!!
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:57 AM   #16
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Joan,

Fist of all, it really isn't THAT bad. Really. That can be remediated and repaired. I have been through much worse and It looks like you caught it before it sat for years. I am of course just going off of the pictures you posted. In the second batch of pictures , I notice that one of the carriage bolts has come out of the word and it looks like maybe you chipped out the rotted wood with a screwdriver or something. Does that sound about right?

That's going to be the toughest part. Based on how soft that piece had gotten, leaving it and remediating might have been better but who knows. You can sister that with new good wood and retain a lot of the original strength. The fact that there is a carriage bolt there would lead me to believe that it sits on the frame or is that bolt to hold the steps on?

What to do now? Well, lets start by killing as much of the rot and mold as you can. Go to the local auto parts store or even Wal-Mart and buy a gallon of 100% straight green antifreeze (Ethylene Glycol). Don't get the premixed 50/50 solution. Also get a medium size cheap paintbrush and a small cup or something to hold the antifreeze.

Slather the antifreeze all over everything that has been in contact with the water. Even if it hasn't discolored, get it soaked in the antifreeze. It is important to get the brush under those beams; just slide it along the bottom between the wood and that tarp-like undercarriage material. Get all the wood that you can that runs along the bottom of the wall coming from the corner that was leaking. Check the other direction from the corner as well as water could have wicked that way. Pull out as much of the damp insulation as you can reach. You will be pulling up a lot of wallpaper but you have already started that process so... what can you do right?

Once you have saturated all bad areas with the Antifreeze, let the camper dry out for a week. If you can keep the AC running and point a fan into the hole in the floor, that will certainly help.


This will kill all mold and dryrot and treat the wood to resist any more for up to a year. At this point, you can figure out how you want to go about fixing this. That may depend on how handy your friends are and how much they want to tackle. The great thing about the aluminum sided trailers is that you can literaly strip them down to the wood and build them back up again. I doubt they want to do that but they could.

If the affected wood is not complete mush, you can recover without replacing. By that I mean, if you push on the bad wood does it just feel damp, does some moisture squish out but no dent is left, does your finger leave a dent or does it fall apart like shredded wheat that has been in the milk for a while? If it is the first two (and even sometimes the 3rd!) scenario, you don't have to replace the wood. I researched penetrating epoxies for days and went with the 2 part from rotdoctor.com.

Wood preservation, rot repair, and restoration using epoxy resin on boats, homes and log homes.

I picked up the CPES in the 2 pint quantity and it went a LONG way. I still have about 1/3 left in each tin. I also got the syringe applicator kit and I highly recommend that as it was very heavy duty and made getting the epoxy into hard to reach areas much easier. They have instructions on their site and send a book of printed directions with your order.

Basically, you mix the 2 part epoxy right before applying it to the damaged but dry wood. It seeps right into the wood like magic and hardens up in about 2 days. After that, the wood is harder than before it was ever damaged. It really does work.

Here is a thread I started when I had to do some similar work on the floor under the toilet in our previous Sunline. I didn't have to use the epoxy in this portion but I did when I had to rebuild the entire bottom rear of the same trailer.

Bathroom Floor Repair

but once again. Your damage is not that bad. Relax. It will be ok. Hopefully you have stopped the leak in the corner by this point.
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Old 05-14-2014, 12:57 PM   #17
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Hi,

1st off, I am really a newbie to this sort of thing so it looked horrible to me. I mean HORRIBLE

Secondly, I wish you lived near me! Absolutely, GREAT information!
I do not know anyone (no husband/boyfriend and no /family/friend) who has the time or skills necessary to help repair her.

Too answer some questions:

you chipped out the rotted wood with a screwdriver or something. Does that sound about right?

Yes that's right

is that bolt to hold the steps on?

Yes however I was cleaning her before I discovered the leak and was going in and out of the camper and I was obviously holding up however I have not been using the steps since

Pull out as much of the damp insulation as you can reach.

Did that

By that I mean, if you push on the bad wood does it just feel damp, does some moisture squish out but no dent is left, does your finger leave a dent or does it fall apart like shredded wheat that has been in the milk for a while?

The spot by the door where I took some wood out was the worst. The frame under the door and the cross beam for the sub floor. Either the leak or the low spot. The rest I can feel is damp but still feels solid. The fan has helped to dry it some what but we have had so much rain the humidity has been high.

point a fan into the hole in the floor,

I did/doing that and used the Maxx fan to circulate air

It's been raining here also every day so I "batten down the hatches" so as not to get anymore water. Since I am not sure where its leaking, frt corner, door, window I covered all

HERE IS THE RUB:

I am in the process of packing and moving out of my house and was supposed to move into the trailer. I do not have time to do everything. I am already so tired I can't see straight. My closing is May 30 then I have to be out June 19 and wanted to be able to pack the camper to live in her so I am so crunched for time. (I do have a place to stay and to take the camper if she is not ready to lived in by that time.)

However, can the treatment wait for a few days? Or should it be done ASAP?

I was going to take it in this coming Monday (to the repairman) because this weekend I decided to go ahead and go to the Mid West Sunline M&G that's is not to far from where I live. John B and some other there will look at it and they are helping me with a few other things. But IF its better to treat her ASAP and it can't wait a few more days than I guess I can cancel.

Repair service is www.happycampermobilervservice.com and got an initial quote of several thousand dollars. Based on the photos I sent. Said it would be 3-4 days of work. Of course he would not know for sure until her got her and opened up the damage area.
It would be great if I can remediate that with your advise!

Maybe I can try and find someone who can treat the camper before I take her to be fixed? Would that be the best solution? Treat her first??

OR

Could it possibly be repaired using your information without taking it to the repairman IF I knew/found someone who was a good handy man??

Thank You!!!!!!!!!!


P.S Is dog in your profile pic a Great Pyrenees?




Quote:
Originally Posted by OhhWell View Post
Joan,

Fist of all, it really isn't THAT bad. Really. That can be remediated and repaired. I have been through much worse and It looks like you caught it before it sat for years. I am of course just going off of the pictures you posted. In the second batch of pictures , I notice that one of the carriage bolts has come out of the word and it looks like maybe you chipped out the rotted wood with a screwdriver or something. Does that sound about right?

That's going to be the toughest part. Based on how soft that piece had gotten, leaving it and remediating might have been better but who knows. You can sister that with new good wood and retain a lot of the original strength. The fact that there is a carriage bolt there would lead me to believe that it sits on the frame or is that bolt to hold the steps on?

What to do now? Well, lets start by killing as much of the rot and mold as you can. Go to the local auto parts store or even Wal-Mart and buy a gallon of 100% straight green antifreeze (Ethylene Glycol). Don't get the premixed 50/50 solution. Also get a medium size cheap paintbrush and a small cup or something to hold the antifreeze.

Slather the antifreeze all over everything that has been in contact with the water. Even if it hasn't discolored, get it soaked in the antifreeze. It is important to get the brush under those beams; just slide it along the bottom between the wood and that tarp-like undercarriage material. Get all the wood that you can that runs along the bottom of the wall coming from the corner that was leaking. Check the other direction from the corner as well as water could have wicked that way. Pull out as much of the damp insulation as you can reach. You will be pulling up a lot of wallpaper but you have already started that process so... what can you do right?

Once you have saturated all bad areas with the Antifreeze, let the camper dry out for a week. If you can keep the AC running and point a fan into the hole in the floor, that will certainly help.


This will kill all mold and dryrot and treat the wood to resist any more for up to a year. At this point, you can figure out how you want to go about fixing this. That may depend on how handy your friends are and how much they want to tackle. The great thing about the aluminum sided trailers is that you can literaly strip them down to the wood and build them back up again. I doubt they want to do that but they could.

If the affected wood is not complete mush, you can recover without replacing. By that I mean, if you push on the bad wood does it just feel damp, does some moisture squish out but no dent is left, does your finger leave a dent or does it fall apart like shredded wheat that has been in the milk for a while? If it is the first two (and even sometimes the 3rd!) scenario, you don't have to replace the wood. I researched penetrating epoxies for days and went with the 2 part from rotdoctor.com.

Wood preservation, rot repair, and restoration using epoxy resin on boats, homes and log homes.

I picked up the CPES in the 2 pint quantity and it went a LONG way. I still have about 1/3 left in each tin. I also got the syringe applicator kit and I highly recommend that as it was very heavy duty and made getting the epoxy into hard to reach areas much easier. They have instructions on their site and send a book of printed directions with your order.

Basically, you mix the 2 part epoxy right before applying it to the damaged but dry wood. It seeps right into the wood like magic and hardens up in about 2 days. After that, the wood is harder than before it was ever damaged. It really does work.

Here is a thread I started when I had to do some similar work on the floor under the toilet in our previous Sunline. I didn't have to use the epoxy in this portion but I did when I had to rebuild the entire bottom rear of the same trailer.

Bathroom Floor Repair

but once again. Your damage is not that bad. Relax. It will be ok. Hopefully you have stopped the leak in the corner by this point.
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Old 05-14-2014, 03:02 PM   #18
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Long post coming up....
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Old 05-14-2014, 03:50 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apackoftwo View Post
Hi,

1st off, I am really a newbie to this sort of thing so it looked horrible to me. I mean HORRIBLE

Secondly, I wish you lived near me! Absolutely, GREAT information!
I do not know anyone (no husband/boyfriend and no /family/friend) who has the time or skills necessary to help repair her.

Too answer some questions:

you chipped out the rotted wood with a screwdriver or something. Does that sound about right?

Yes that's right

is that bolt to hold the steps on?

Yes however I was cleaning her before I discovered the leak and was going in and out of the camper and I was obviously holding up however I have not been using the steps since

Pull out as much of the damp insulation as you can reach.

Did that

By that I mean, if you push on the bad wood does it just feel damp, does some moisture squish out but no dent is left, does your finger leave a dent or does it fall apart like shredded wheat that has been in the milk for a while?

The spot by the door where I took some wood out was the worst. The frame under the door and the cross beam for the sub floor. Either the leak or the low spot. The rest I can feel is damp but still feels solid. The fan has helped to dry it some what but we have had so much rain the humidity has been high.

point a fan into the hole in the floor,

I did/doing that and used the Maxx fan to circulate air

It's been raining here also every day so I "batten down the hatches" so as not to get anymore water. Since I am not sure where its leaking, frt corner, door, window I covered all

HERE IS THE RUB:

I am in the process of packing and moving out of my house and was supposed to move into the trailer. I do not have time to do everything. I am already so tired I can't see straight. My closing is May 30 then I have to be out June 19 and wanted to be able to pack the camper to live in her so I am so crunched for time. (I do have a place to stay and to take the camper if she is not ready to lived in by that time.)

However, can the treatment wait for a few days? Or should it be done ASAP?

I was going to take it in this coming Monday (to the repairman) because this weekend I decided to go ahead and go to the Mid West Sunline M&G that's is not to far from where I live. John B and some other there will look at it and they are helping me with a few other things. But IF its better to treat her ASAP and it can't wait a few more days than I guess I can cancel.

Repair service is www.happycampermobilervservice.com and got an initial quote of several thousand dollars. Based on the photos I sent. Said it would be 3-4 days of work. Of course he would not know for sure until her got her and opened up the damage area.
It would be great if I can remediate that with your advise!

Maybe I can try and find someone who can treat the camper before I take her to be fixed? Would that be the best solution? Treat her first??

OR

Could it possibly be repaired using your information without taking it to the repairman IF I knew/found someone who was a good handy man??

Thank You!!!!!!!!!!


P.S Is dog in your profile pic a Great Pyrenees?
If I lived near you, I would help you out in a second. As it is, we are a bit far apart...

Yes, the dog is a Pyr and his name is Bear. We traveled up to the Tennessee boarder to pick him up from a litter born to two working LGDs on a farm up there. We picked the one who most coveted human attention as he was to be a family dog and boy did we get that! We also have an American Fox hound / Pyrenees mix and an Akita/Lab mix.

First off, don't you dare pay someone thousands to do this repair.

Next, the tarps are obviously going to have to come off at some point. The 100% correct and long term way to fix leaking seams is to take the seam or door frame off, clean it all out, put butyl tape back down and re-attach the seam. I don't think you have time for that so, go get yourself a tube or 2 of Proflex RV sealant. It is a lot like silicone but made of completely different chemicals. Run a bead ALL along where the door frame meets the camper side. This stuff is sticky and tacky but it will do the job. I use a damp paper towel to immediately clean up any spots where I put too much on. Then you will want to do the same to the windows, marker lights, strips that run up every corner edge, hot water heater, furnace... You get the idea, everything that stick to or out of the sides but NOT THE ROOF. Once you get the hang of it, you can have the whole camper knocked out in an hour or two. As long as the leak isn't on the roof, this should buy you a year or two.

I haven't been on SOC in a while so I have to ask if you have gone up on a ladder and inspected the sealant all over the roof?

As far as treating the camper and your move etc... That is a tough one. The thing about the Ethylene Glycol is that it is extremely toxic and you cannot have your dog in there while treating. It will take you probably 2-3 hours to slather on enough antifreeze to saturate the affected wood. after that, you can pack the trailer and do whatever you want while it dries, you just have to make sure no animals can get in there. Sometimes I lack a bit of patience so when I was treating mine, I sat in the camper one night with the AC on high and used a hair dryer on the floor for an hour or so.

You mentioned that the wood feels damp but solid. That is excellent. My gut feeling and rough estimate is that you could do this repair yourself for about $100 - $200 in supplies if you had proper tools.

Did you take a quick peek at the link to the repair I did on my bathroom floor? I will put a pic or two here to illustrate what I am going to try to describe. The toughest part of this whole repair is going to be patching up the wood that you had to pull out (well, and making the wallpaper look nice again after this is all done). The wood that is damp will be repaired by the penetrating epoxy and is just as simple as applying the epoxy to it and waiting 2 days!

So, to patch the wood... That beam that runs under your door and had the carriage bolt for the steps is not going to be replaced with any ease. My best recommendation is to clean up the cutout and sister it with a notched piece of good wood. Here is a picture and explanation of what I mean.



Take a look at the new wood closest to the bottom of the picture running somewhat horizontal to our perspective. You see how the new wood has a long "tab" that fits into the notch I cut out of the bad wood? That is what you are going to have to do under your door. I had it a bit easier as I could just cut it with a Jig. You can still get a nice neat cut in yours but you will have to use an oscillating tool.

I bought one of these when I had some real tricky cuts to make in the back of our old TT.

http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-MM30-01...cillating+tool

That tool will cut right into the wood beam and you can get a blade that is the same size as the wood. You would make 2 cuts, one on each side of the bad spot and only deep enough to remove the problem area.

Ok, so now you would have 2 cuts into the wood but... how do you get the wood in between the cuts out? Well with a 90 degree blade for the same tool like this:

Buy Imperial 90 Degree Reach Bi-Metal Blade at Woodcraft.com

This would be some tedious work but you cut out bits as wide as the 90deg portion of that blade alternating to the normal blade. I know it is hard to make sense of that but as soon as you got to as far as that 90 will cut in, you would see what I am saying. This is the part that will take the most skill as you want as straight and even of a cut with as constant of a depth as possible.

Once all that fun is over, you measure how deep the notch is that you cut out. Then you make the cuts in a nice clean dry piece of wood from the hardware store to create a tab that would fit in the notch you just made in the bad wood. Here is an awful markup on one of your pictures to try to illustrate what I am talking about.



Cutting up as much of the floor as you can to make the good wood as long as possible will help with strength of the repair. If you can get enough floor up go to the next joist in each direction, that would be perfect and will help when you replace the section of floor you cut out. Making the cutout as close to a perfect rectangle helps as well. As you can see in the picture, you are obviously going to have to cut that joist to fir the new wood in. Use L brackets to secure the joist to the new wood.



I used large lag bolts to attach the good wood to the old wood in mine. You will probably find it easiest to remove that dangling carriage bolt and use another lag bolt to replace it. Lag bolts are very large and need a pilot hole drilled first. It is unlikely that the lag you use to replace the carriage bolt for the stairs will bite into completely new wood so what I would do is go back inside and run 2 lag bolts on either side through the good and old wood sandwiching it. Man, it is hard to describe that in words.

OK, so. After that, the worst is over. If you expanded your cutout earlier you just have to cut a patch out of plywood to replace the gaping hole in your floor. A circular saw and jig saw are all you would really need. The circular saw should be adjusted so it only cuts as deep as the floor is thick. This way you can make a nice straight cut right over the top of that joist. You use the Jig saw when you get close to the walls. Sunline used particle board for the floor. Measure how thick it is and get a piece of plywood of the same thickness. Measure your hole or even better, trace the outline on a large piece of butcher paper or something and cut a piece of the plywood to fit.

Ok, if you just put the replacement plywood right down on the hole, it is going to flex and not hold up on the edges. If you were able to cut the opening right up to a joist in either direction left and right from the door, cut a length of 1x1 or something that will fit in the hole and screw right into the joist running parallel to it and flush with the top of the joist. This is going to support the edges of the plywood. If you could not get the hole to the joists, cut some legths of 2x4 will go in the hole and run under the existing floor on either end (Perpendicular tot he door). They should lie flat. Place them so that half (2") of the wood is under the old floor and screw down into it through the old floor. Do that on both ends. This will tie it into the existing floor well.

Almost done. Now just drop the replacement plywood down and screw it into the extra supports you made. Since the existing floor is just particle board and has been in place for years, the plywood may be thicker in some spots. It was in mine. You can sand down the plywood. If it is much higher, you can either sand more use wood filler to even out the transition and sand it down to a nice even slope. Then you just clean up and put your flooring down.

Remember though, you have to pull of the wallpaper to get at the wood along the wall/floor line and door framing to apply the treatment and epoxy to it. That will leave it looking a bit rough but everything will be solid and fixed. You appear to like doing remodeling so maybe.... New wallpaper?

Don't pay thousands. It sounds like they want to tear it down and replace the entire wood framing. That is great and all but really not necessary and if you think you are stressed now, imagine if they had to tear your camper apart for 4 days. Someone who is handy should be able to do the wood work in an afternoon with decent tools.

Hang in there. you can relax in a month or so....
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1950, door frame, subfloor, water leak


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