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Old 05-10-2009, 08:06 AM   #1
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long term travel question

This is for you folks that go out for months at a time. With no large wardrobe, where do you store enough clothing? We've easily done 3 weeks, but I'm talking about the really long trips like Norm & Ginnie or Pat & Cindy or Frank & Sharon take. It's impossible to get away from cold, so you'd have to need coats. And occassionally I'll see a picture on their website of Cindy all dressed up, and think "now where does she store that outfit?" And I can't even begin to imagine where you put enough clothing in a 1550 or a QUE.
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Old 05-10-2009, 11:28 AM   #2
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Good Question

We minimize what we take. Wash clothes about once a week and always have stuff we never wear at the end of the trip. This year we traveled for 10 of the last 12 months and really never wanted for anything.

We don't carry winter clothing, even when we went to Labrador last Spring, and we do hike about quite a bit. For cold weather we layer. We do carry rain jackets with hoods. We keep them in the car because you never know when you're going to need them. In addition we keep a sweatshirt or a sweater in the car at all times. If we feel it's a cold day we put an extra sweater on. We both carry a heavy wool sweater and really have never felt cold.

We keep no other clothes in the car except for a cap. We do have a backpack in the car. Among survival type equipment including a can of bear spray, we keep snacks and two winter watch knit caps.

On this trip we each took three pairs of jeans, 5 pairs of shorts, about 10 short sleve shirts/jersey/Ts, a couple of pullovers. This is all in the overhead over the dinette. We each have one cabinet. My wife says we brought too many shirts.

We also carry a pair of dress slacks, a pair of chinos, two dress shirts, 3 long sleve jerseys, two sweaters (one a dress sweater). There was spare room in the overhead over the bed. Extra sheets, an extra blanket and a corning wear dish also are kept in this compartment.

For shoes, sneakers, Keenes (fancy sneakers and really good), 1 pair shoes, 1 pair of sandals. We carry shoes in a plastic container under the bed. I wear Keenes most of the time, great grippers. My son bought them after I took a real spill on the rocks in Labrador.

Enough underwear and socks for 10-14 days. In addition my wife brought a couple of nightgowns. We both had a bathing suit. Underwear in two plastic containers in a pullout draw under a dinete. The other dinette has one plastic container for wife's miscellaneous.

We do not carry an iron or anything on hangers. If we wear our raincoat into the trailer, they hang on a hook, probably to dry if their coming in the trailer. Our primary bath towels also hang on hooks.

We have two cabinets under the sink/stove. One holds 3 pots, 3 bowls and a platter, one 2 frying pans. The third draw holds a coffee pot and a toaster. We have a draw for towels. We have a bread/muffin/bagel draw. The cabinet over the sink/stove contains dishes, cups and glasses.

We have a separate spice rack. The hanging closet contains food. It has four shelves and is generally full.

Under the bed we have four plastic containers. One contains the fore mentioned shoes. One a crock pot, one paper goods, and one a fan (not needed).

We only need one set of dress clothes, we really only use them for church and rarely anyother time.

We see many travelers that have a different outfit for each holiday, red for Valentines, green for St Patricks. We don't do this. Simply wear a little green or little red, nothing special.

As you proabbly know the amount of stuff you take is 110% of the space available We are now getting our Motorhome ready for its first trip in a year. I amazed by how much there is in there sin ce we have been going thru every compartment. You bring what you have space for and unfortunately rarely remove what you don't use.

I hope that helps and more than happy to share our eight years with our fellow SUnliners.

Happy Mothers Day to all,

Norm and Ginny Milliard
1982 Sunline 15.5 SB
2004 Honda CRv
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Old 05-10-2009, 02:18 PM   #3
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Tweety.......

LOL! Actually, we minimized our wardrobe requirements years ago, and pack the same amount of clothing for a one-week or 6-week trip. Or longer, if we manage that this year. And it no longer matters what size trailer....we'd do the same. Just keep in mind that we are seriously informal in dress, and that we are really not cold weather campers. Late Fall, Winter, and early Spring trips are invariably southward (towards FL, usually).

==> 1 jacket each hanging in the wardrobe.
==> For each of us, we take along 4 days shirts/pants hanging in the wardrobe (the pants are usually all jeans), plus the clothes we wear to leave.
==> Six days underwear and socks in drawers (not much space required), plus what we're wearing.
==> 1 pair of flip-flops and 2 pairs of shoes (each) plus what we're wearing.
==> In a plastic tub in the truck bed (under the tonneau cover) is a "backup emergency" outfit and jacket, and spare towels and washcloths. We almost never need to use the emergency items.
A real clothing emergency might necessitate a trip to WalMart.

==> We are seldom at a campground more than 4 days. But every 4th day we hit a campground laundry (5 days if the 4th's has a poor laundry setup). Used clothing is washed every time. Sheets get washed every other time. Towels....depends on the trip.

==> We are minimalists on cookware, dishes, flatware.. We're big microwave fans.

That's probably more detail than you wanted.... but it works well for us. We actually had some unused cabinet space in the Que on the 6-week trip to the west coast in '07.

Frank & Sharon
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Old 05-10-2009, 03:01 PM   #4
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Minimalism is the name of the game

My wife and I talk about minimalisim frequently now that we've spent a lot of time in a 12x7 space of our SUnline. We probably talked about it as well when we moved from the house to the motorhome but moving to the trailer was even more significant.

Obviously our rig is tiny, but the overhead is also tiny. It's inexpensive to buy, costs a fraction of the big rigs to tow, the tow vehicle is inexpensive, and it's tiny enough to fully understand. I certainly wishe we had discovered it when we started RVing.

There is potential for even more benefits if the proposed Waxman/Obama Carbon taxes are approved driving towing costs and everything up dramatically.

Now when we're home we recognize the burden of bigness and how little we really need.

We like Frank and Sharon are now minimalists. We hardly ever buy clothes, usually only when our sizes change. I admit to loosing 50 pounds over the eight years of extensive travel. My doctor tells people who come in and are not well, to buy an RV and get on the road.

As time progresses we are looking for additional ways to reduce the cost of RVing aiming to move toward additional independence by adding a solar panel to our little home, like Pat and Cindy. (We are now in the process of adding a dry shower.)

Also like Pat we have added a wireless router so two of can be using a computer on our Verizon Wireless Broadband card.

We are or have elimiated land line phones and cable service from our home, using the services we have in our RV travel at home.

We follow a budget through the yearl. Over eight years I've recorded every expense, not so much to restrict costs, though it does, but rather to make us conscious of our spending. In the process of being conscious we tend to spend more carefully.

Summing it up, during our travels I never feel we're going without. I never feel competitive pressure with my former peers that may have driven part of my past. I comfortably park between rigs where my trailer would fit in their slideout living areas. Another magic of the travel is you're geneally away from the everyday pressure of family and friends, their every day bobbles are no longer your issue as well; yet when theirs a real medical issue you can be quickly at a friend or family members side for an extended period. it's all so magic.

I love RVing and my Sunline,

Norm Milliard
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Old 05-10-2009, 05:41 PM   #5
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Thanks for the nice informative answers. Now that I think about it I do bring alot of unused clothing back into the house after a trip, and alot of uneaten food. I'm SURE I can't do without a coat though...I'm sitting here now on May 10th in a turtle neck and sweatshirt. LOL If you think of anything else...keep the info coming
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Old 05-10-2009, 08:01 PM   #6
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Small thinking

If you have any specific questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

I am very sensitive to temperature and feel cold easily. This year was the coldest year of our travels. One of the beauties of our small space is that it heats very quickly.

Very often I'll have four layers. Our outerlayer is a rain coat, jacket style, that is a very effective wind break. I purchased it some years ago from LL Bean. It is very 'snuggable", velcro on the sleves, can be tightened around the bottom and can be really tight around the head, yet it all collapses into a pocket of the jacket. Keeping the wind out is key, particularly in the coastal areas of our trips. If it's really cold I wear a Short sleve jersey or T with a medium weight turtle neck covered by a heavy Nordic sweater. We always bring silk long johns with us but have only worn them once in 8 years.

Winter coats can be like many bed covering configurations, heavy but not warming causing you to still have to layer. Speaking of Bed coverings we have electric blankets on both our RV beds. They make it possible to sleep wonderfully in a cool space yet always feel warm.

We do have the one thing in/one thing out rule. We also try to keep track of what we don't use and remove it before our next trip. When we first started RVing we made a list of virtually every item in each compartment to help guide us. Each year we go through and remove the things we don't need or use.

We don't have a microwave or oven in our little trailer somewhat reducing what we carry, for example no mixer, no muffin pan, ...., however we have learned to survive without them. We both like to cook and manage to do well with what we have.

Your rig is twice the size of ours and I think you should to be able to fit everything you need. I do think you want to consider everything you put in the trailer, is it needed, can something else do the job better. You need to have a different mind set.

As near full timers I think we have become closer to being one entity as a couple, definitely spending more time together, sharing more thoughts, and having more fun. Certainly we have gradually come to thinking about the trailer and what we need as a couple. It took a while for Ginny to realize we need to consider the worth of everything we bring.

One of the magic things with our little trailer over our beloved Motorhome is its ability to go to Dunkin Donuts. Small can be very positive. Also some of the places we've gone our relatively small motorhome, 32ft, has had difficulty fitting - Chaco Canyon leaps to mind,

Norm and Ginny Milliard
1982 Sunline 15.5 SB
2004 Honda CRV
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:21 AM   #7
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Norm & Ginny's comments are quite close to our feelings, but do bring another point to mind. There is a definite individual difference in the importance of space for "stuff", space for folks, and features for folks.

A good example of this includes our own experiences and less-than-perfect rv selections over the years.

==> Back in the 80's, our little 15.5 was a great trailer for a 30 day western trip for 2 parents, a 14-year-old son, and 10-year-old daughter.
==> Flash forward to late 2006, when we decided we really had to downsize. Although we enjoyed our last "big" Sunline, it really made life more complicated on the road. We traded for the Que, falling for - among other things - its great bathroom/shower design.
==> Now forward to late 2008. After 25,000 miles with the Que, we both admitted to each other that we had downsized a bit too far......for the particular design that was the Que SE. It had no dinette, and one couldn't really sit upright and lean back on the front sofa due to the slope of the front. Translation....we couldn't stay comfortable in the Que.

Which, with the pure-dumb-luck outrageously good deal on the Hi-Lo that we ran across in MN, resulted in a little upsizing for living space. And with its dinette and gaucho...we can stay comfortable.

Now reflecting on this, I realize that the slightly shorter 15.5 was overall a better design for living space than was the Que. That front dinette/back gaucho design is probably as good as it gets in a trailer that small.

Frank
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:55 AM   #8
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15.5 SB

Frank,

The only real drawback we find in the 15.5 is the lack of a real shower, shortly to be corrected in our rig. The other improvement would be a dinette for two. We have already decreased the size of the dinette's table and have now cut the bathroom side dinette side seat to add a dry shower.

We do keep the rear gaucho set up as a bed and would dream for a comfy chair by the 'now' bed. If the rig were 2 feet longer, something we're considering. However it seems this year we'll only get the dry shower done, add a thin, floor to ceiling pantry to the left of the bathroom door, a solar panel with a second battery.

Certainly every RVer must find what fits them best.

I do have a question. What kind of mileage do you get towing the Hi/Lo/? I'm interested in how frontal area affects mileage.

Thank you and happy RVing,

Norm and Ginny
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Old 05-11-2009, 09:39 AM   #9
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Really goods points have been made by both of you. We're thinking of traveling for a year or 2 between selling the big house and downsizing to a small one. Norm...I have an LL Bean jacket just like you discribe that I got at the outlet in Maine...just never thought about layer under it. It is indeed very wind and waterproof. I'll have to try that.
We have an electric mattress pad that uses very little electricity.
Steve has ordered a small inverter from WalMart that I'll be picking up next week. That should allow us to run the computer, TV, and mattress pad.
We weeded out some extra camp chairs that never seemed to get used and took up tons of space. We have these 2 cool LL Bean wood/canvas ones that come apart and are less than 2" thick and perfectly flat. If our kids join us anywhere they'll just have to BYOC.
I agree that there are some really positive things about a small unit. It is MUCH more difficult for us to get fuel with Tweety than it was with the QUE. And pulling over at a roadside stand or diner is usually impossible.
The QUE could really fit virtually at any campsite and pull over almost anywhere. But, as Frank pointed out, you just can't be comfortable for a length of time with no place to sit! and making the bed every night just wasn't my cup of tea. The 1550 is an ideal layout, although another 2 feet would make for a bigger bed and nicer bathroom!
Steve and I were just saying last night that we wonder what the difference in gas mileage between the QUE and the Hi-Lo is. Have you come up with the ideal living situation with the Hi-Lo?
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Old 05-11-2009, 02:26 PM   #10
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Let's see if I can answer both Norm's and Pam's "Towing Que vs. Towing Hi-Lo" questions....

This is a comparison between our 11-2007 and 4-2009 trips to Florida. In both cases we were towing with the Tacoma PreRunner Doublecab (2x4, 236 hp V6,), and in both cases driving conservatively (but not getting fanatic about mileage). About 5% of the mileage on each trip was done without the TT in tow. We log all gas purchases and mileages on the truck.

==> 2007, towing Que SE, (unloaded vehicle weight 2700 lbs, not including AC, Awning, GVW 3500 lbs): 3257 miles (included Key West), 13.865 mpg.

==> 2009, towing Hi-Lo TowLite 2208T (unloaded vehicle weight 3332 lbs, not including AC, Awning, Optional "skybed", GVW 5500 lbs): 2722 miles ( to Silver Springs, Cypress Gardens), 15.432 mpg.

The mpg difference on the two, while only 1.567 mpg, is an actual increase of 11.3 %. As the Hi-Lo weighs 23% more (using the UVW #s), the difference must be the reduction in frontal area.

Storage space in the Hi-Lo isn't much greater (shorter overhead cabinets), but the living space is way up as compared to the Que.

Caveat: altho the shower arrangements in the Hi-Lo are acceptable... they don't equal the Que's (but we couldn't LIVE in the shower) .


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Old 05-11-2009, 02:45 PM   #11
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Campers are all about compromise! I agree with you...I'd give up my gorgeous shower for separate places to sit and sleep. Can't wait to see it in person at the M&G.
Also looking forward to Norm's pictures of their bathroom mod...
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:18 PM   #12
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Compromise

Life is certainly about choice and compromise.

We, unlike many of you, are really shortimers as RVers. We never Rved until we retired some 8 years ago. Our choice of a rig was based primarily on what we read, what we could afford, and our existing living experiences.

Knowing what we know now we would have selected a smaller rig and not purchased the motorhome, so much of our RV costs are tied up in the drive train of the motorhome, though it provides more than ample space.

It turns out we choose a motorhome over a trailer because we didn't own an appropriate tow vehicle. We would, at that time, probably have spent as much on a truck tow vehicle as we spent on the motorhome.

As for sepeate places to sleep and sit, I'm as happy in bed as anywhere though I would like a seperate comfy chair for my wife, hence I thinking about next year's renovation to make room for that chair.

In retrospect a trailer is a better deal. Trailers can virtually last forever.

Live and learn.

As we've aged we like being able to sweep out the trailer with a small handheld brush in minutes versus getting the vacuum out from under the motorhome's bed (though dramatically easier than vacuuming the whole house). One thing we definitely recognize is that life is short and the remaining time not all that great. Maximize funn, minimize the things you have to do to be able to have fun, for you engineers my first mentor told me to "maximize the fun integral".

Have fun,

Norm and Ginny
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:42 PM   #13
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Re: long term travel question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweety
This is for you folks that go out for months at a time. With no large wardrobe, where do you store enough clothing? We've easily done 3 weeks, but I'm talking about the really long trips like Norm & Ginnie or Pat & Cindy or Frank & Sharon take. It's impossible to get away from cold, so you'd have to need coats. And occassionally I'll see a picture on their website of Cindy all dressed up, and think "now where does she store that outfit?" And I can't even begin to imagine where you put enough clothing in a 1550 or a QUE.
In the 1970s I took a month long trip with a friend. We lived in a converted Dodge Tradesman Van. We had a homemade 3/4 bed, small stove and fridge, 5g water container and our toilet was a hinged door in the floor. We had our clothing stored on the shelves (along the extended roof) and did our laundry once a week at a CG. We mostly dry camped but stopped to do laundry and shower at least once a week. Doing our laundry every 6 to 7 days kept us in clothing with no problem. There's no need to take loads of clothing unless you plan to stay in the boonies for weeks at a time. In that case you can wash them by hand like people did in the old days.
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Old 05-21-2009, 10:09 AM   #14
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Sorry it took so long to add an answer to this question, been up in the Ozarks for some time now and our signal has been anything but strong. Once you get used to a fast signal, it's not worth it to sit and wait for a page to load for a few minutes so we just stay off the computer.

Cindys Comments:
Socks, Underware and anything that can be waddled up and doesnt need to worry about being wrinkled goes in the drawer under the bed.

My side of the closet has a hanging shelving unit I bought from Target that fits in there perfect. It gives me 5 shelves to put folded items on. I think it was called a folded sweater hanger.

In the bin above the bed, I have removable shelves up there and my 7 pairs of jeans go in a basket that I can pull in and out to look through and keep folded neatly.

Above the basket is the removable shelving unit (one of the white wire types) that holds a few various items and to the right of that (The Middle section that is hard to get to) holds some cold weather sweatshirts and stuff we dont use as much.

Hanging items goes on Pats side of the closet as he only has our Riding jackets in there since he's a man, and doesnt need to hang anything or worry about wrinkles.

We do carry a full array of winter gear which goes on the Roof Top Storage Unit in a Garbage Bag.


Notice the Roof Top Carrier on the top in this image? We found it on Craigs List for $50 and it holds things like Winter Clothing, Winter Boots, a bag full of gloves, hats and technical gear that we've bought and paid good money for and dont want to have to repurchase when the need comes.

Pats Responce:

I have a few pair of pants that are all the super-light-weight hiking type that I wear for days when pants are needed. About 5 pair of light weight swim-style shorts that I live in and about a dozen t-shirts (Short & Long Sleeve) that all goes in the cabinet above the bed.

Underware and socks go in the drawer under the bed and we both keep a few Polartech jackets that are lightweight hanging in the camper. Best thing about Polartech fabric is you can wear it on a cool night in the spring or summer, and layer it with a nylon windbreaker on a colder night and it will keep you comfortable.

I'll admit that I'm a Jacket Collector and have way too many along with my Hat Collection. But being bald, you tend to always have a hat on to keep sun off your head and keep it warm in the cooler temps. The drawer under the bed is about 90% knit hats that I wear year round.

Cindy's outfits you mentioned seeing her in are usually a combination of different shirts with different bottoms that she's really good at mixing and matching.

She also has a little 3-drawer cabinet she put at the foot of the bed that holds her collection of shoes. God knows a Woman Needs her shoe collection.

She can even amaze me at times when she will come out with an outift that I might have seen each piece a hundred times, but the way she has it mixed and matched makes it look like something new. Especially if she pairs it with a pair of hiking boots or a set of heels.

Remember this is coming from a girl that had a 12x15 walk-in closet when we lived in a stick house. So I commend her on being able to live with so little.

All is all, if we needed to pack all our clothes in two duffle bags, we probably could, but they wouldnt be folded nicely.

Here is what I'd recommend. Go on a few week long trips and notice how much you wear. Put some post it notes on each piece of clothing. If you see you've taken off all the post it notes, you're probably too worried about your image...LOL

Living on the road, you dont really dirty a shirt or a pair of pants the way you would going about normal daily actions working around the house or going from work and back.

Time when we're hiking and doing alot outdoors, I do notice we tend to go through all of our clothes very quickly. But we just find a laundromat and have everything washed in a few loads and are ready to go back at it.
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